Update WSUS to show Windows 8 Computers as Windows 8 not Windows XP

If you have a server running Windows Server Update Services 3.0 SP2 (SBS 2003 / SBS 2008 / SBS 2011 etc) and you also have some Windows 8 clients that you have joined to the domain, they will probably show up in WSUS as Windows XP Clients not Windows 8!

To resolve this, please install the following patch from Microsoft:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2734608/en-us

Once installed, you should see the Windows 8 clients reported as Windows 8.

SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 Migration Performed Remotely in Toronto Canada (from the UK)

Last night I started to perform a migration from SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 for a company in Toronto where Peter was going to be onsite to manage the migration from the local end.

The start time for me was 9:00pm (UK time) and prior to starting, I had asked Peter to make sure the SBS 2003 server was fully patched, had the Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analzyer tool installed (and to reboot the server afterwards), check that Exchange 2003 Service Pack 2 was installed and also that Small Business Server 2003 SP1 had been installed properly, something that quite often doesn’t get installed properly as it isn’t a simple download from Microsoft via Windows Update.

I also asked Peter to run a DCDIAG report (after installing the Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 32-bit Support Tools) to make sure that all was well and email me the results

The only item that needed fixing from the DCDIAG report was to set the Intersite Messaging Service to Automatic and Start the service, something that is quite often not set to Automatic on SBS 2003 from my experiecnce.

All being well, it was time to start the migration.  I asked Peter to insert the SBS 2011 DVD into the SBS 2003 server and then once fired up, we installed the Migration Preparation Tool (without installing any updates).

The SBS 2003 server was prepared happily, the Migration Answer File created and saved to a Memory Stick (USB Key) and then the server was rebooted.

It was then time to build the new server, and Peter had chosen an HP ProLiant DL360 G7 server (nice!).  To cut a long story short, there were a few problems with the build and after referring him to my other blog article here he happily created a bootable USB key with SBS 2011 on it and then rebuilt the server for a second time, this time more successfully.  Also on the USB Key with SBS 2011 as an .ISO image were the drivers for the RAID Controller and the SBS Answerfile.

After a few reboots and having changed the boot order so that the server would no longer boot from the USB Key after the initial Windows build, the server fired up into Migration mode and the Migration could start.

The settings chosen in the SBS Answer file were checked and verified, the Time Zone checked and verified (important to do this manually as the BIOS clock can be way off) and updates were not downloaded for the installation.

After a while, the server rebooted and we were logged in to the SBS 2011 server.  Time to create a new User as the Migration won’t work if you use the default Administrator account.

After the new Admin Account was created we logged off, then on again as the new user and fired up the SBS Console and clicked on the Migrate to Windows SBS link on the Home page.

Having created just a single partition, the first step of relocating the various components of SBS to another drive was skipped and we moved on to the Configure the Network Wizard.  With nothing much to do there apart from click a few buttons (DHCP was not on a router), the wizard completed and we moved onto the next step.

Configuring the Internet Address we selected the relevant domain name and changed the default prefix of ‘Remote’ to a preferred name and completed the wizard.  This failed initially and threw a few errors.  After a few minutes of head scratching and wondering why, I checked the Services and found a handful of Exchange ones not started!  After a bit of encouragement with my mouse, the services were started and the Wizard re-run, this time 100% happily.

At this point, it was time to pause the installation and visit Windows Update.  It was now about 5:40am (UK time) and caffeine had been working happily, but you need to draw the line somewhere and get some sleep, so having selected about 133 Windows Updates and kicked the updates off, I retired to bed as the world was waking up and the light outside was getting lighter 😦

We are planning to pick up the Migration again at 3:00pm UK time today and at the time of writing I am remotely connected to the server and busy installing a raft of other updates that are available and rebooting as and when required.  I have now done this about 3 times and the cupboard is now well and truly bare, so time for more caffeine and to wait for Peter to arrive on-site and then order the SSL certificate from www.exchange-certificates.com and get it approved before moving the mailboxes from the SBS 2003 server to the SBS 2011 server.

So, Peter arrived on site and we order a new SSL certificate from the site above, ran the New Certificate Wizard in the Exchange Management Console to generate a Certificate Signing Request (CSR), took the CSR to the certificate site and copied / pasted the contents into the relevant box and completed the certificate request process.  Now we just had to wait for the approval emails to arrive.  Prior to starting the migration, I had asked Peter to make sure that the Admin contact for the domain was still valid and that he had access to the email account that the Certificate Approval emails would be sent to – he was the Admin contact and thus we wouldn’t have any problems receiving and processing the Certificate Approval emails.

The next step in the migration was to move the mailboxes over from the old server to the new server and that is done via the new server using a “Local Move Request”.  We essentially highlighted all the User mailboxes and then clicked on the New Local Move Request.  We actually selected a few large mailboxes first and then the remainder which were smaller so that the larger ones started to be moved first.

Next was to move the Public Folders and that was simply a case of right-clicking the Public Folder Store and choosing “Move All Replicas”.  There weren’t many Public Folders so I expected this to be a quick process, but after an hour or so of watching the mailboxes move, the Public Folders hadn’t even started to move, so I checked the the SMTP Virtual Server settings and lo and behold, there was some Outbound Authentication that was set because they had previously setup a Smarthost on the SMTP Virtual Server (which I had already removed).  As soon as I removed the outbound authentication and restarted the SMTP Virtual Server, the Public Folders started to move over to the new server and after about 5 minutes, the Public Folder Instances were all empty 🙂

Next was to remove Legacy Group Policies and Logon Settings which essentially is the deletion of old SBS 2003 Group Policies and renaming the SBS_LOGON_SCRIPT.BAT file and removing references to it from ALL user profiles.

The next step in the migration was to setup a batch file to use Robocopy to copy all the User / Company data from the old server to the new server.  I looked at the shares on the old server and didn’t see anything that stood out as a Company Data folder, so asked Peter to identify the relevant data, which he did and I setup the batch file to copy the data he had identified as well as the User Data, which was obvious.

I decided to kick off the data copy batch file (run as Administrator) and then all we could do was sit and wait, so I suggested to Peter that he might like to go and have an extended lunch break and that I would monitor the Mailbox Moves and data copying remotely, then let him know when it was likely to have completed, so he could return to help with the final steps in the migration.

I emailed Peter and arranged for him to return to the office at 8:00pm Toronto time (1:00am UK time).  All the data and mailboxes had moved across by about 1:40am UK time so the next step was to Migrate Fax Data of which there wasn’t any, so we moved on to the next step which was to convert Users and Groups.  All users were assigned the new Standard User role and all Groups were selected and converted – all very simple stuff and quick to perform and by now, the finishing line was in sight.

Before removing Exchange 2003 from the SBS 2003 Server it was time to redirect port 25, 443, 987, 4125 and any other ports being used on the firewall to the new server.  Once completed, I could then remove the Routing Group Connectors that are installed to allow mail to flow between the Exchange 2003 and Exchange 2010 servers during the migration.

It was now time to remove Exchange from the old server by using the Add/Remove Programs, selecting the Small Business Server 2003 application and then running through the various screens until the installed options were visible, then setting Exchange to ‘Remove’ and finishing the wizard.  This process never normally removes exchange fully (in my experience), so I had to refer to an MS KB Article to manually remove the remaining components of Exchange (KB833396).

The final step is to run DCPROMO, but before we do, it is a good idea to check that the SBS 2011 Server is the holder of all FSMO roles.  I found a little file that allows me to do this without having to break sweat – don’t recall where it came from, but I am grateful to the creator.  You can download it from here dumpfsmos.zip.  Having run and verified that my FSMO roles were all held by the SBS 2003 server, I fired up DCPROMO and let it run, making sure I didn’t tick the box that says “This server is the last controller in the domain” as that would cause all kinds of havoc.

For some odd reason – every time I run this the first time, it always fails because the NETLOGON service has been stopped and it complains about it being stopped.  Well the DCPROMO process stops the NETLOGON service, so I am not sure why it gets confused, but it always does, so prepare for it to fail, then start the NETLOGON service up again and re-run DCPROMO again which on the 2nd time of running, will happily complete.

Once done, reboot the server, then login to the local server as the Administrator, using the password you specified during the DCPROMO process and once it is alive, shut it down and keep it handy in case you forgot to get some data from it.  MIGRATION COMPLETED!

The time that the migration was finished was about 3:30am UK time, so from start to finish, the entire process took about 30½ hours, but it has to be said that there was little data to be copied and the mailboxes were small.

The article that I used to guide me through the entire migration, which I will be asking Glen to tweak slightly with some items to make it even better than it is already can be found here.

If after reading it you don’t feel confident enough to tackle the migration yourself, I would be only too happy to assist you.  If you do feel confident enough then I hope your migration goes smoothly and completes quickly.

Alan

SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 Migration – 50Gb of Public Folders to Migrate took a week to migrate!

Having nearly completed yet another SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 Migration after the longest week of my life so far, I was amazed at how slowly the Public Folder Replica Move actually took to push 50Gb of data between the two servers.

Starting the project on a Monday and having the SBS 2011 server built by Monday afternoon (built virtually using Microsoft’s Hyper-V Server on a new HP ProLiant ML350 G6), I started to move the Exchange Mailboxes and then the Public Folder Replicas to the SBS 2011 server.  The network was originally running on a 10/100 Switch but I upgraded it to a Gigabit Switch on the Tuesday morning so that I had the maximum speed available and both servers had Gigabit cards in them.

At the end of the Tuesday, there were still dozens of Public Folders listed in the Public Folder Instances list in the Exchange System Manager, so I checked the SMTP Virtual Server Settings to see if there were any settings configured that might slow the process down and discovered several settings that would restrict the flow of emails.  The initial setting that I noticed was the “Limit session size to (KB):” setting.  This was limited to 40Mb and as some of the emails in the Public Folders were in the region of 30-40Mb in size, the session size was going to severely impact the flow of mail so I changed it to 1024000 (about 1Gb).

The other setting that I changed was the “Connection Timeout” value on the General Tab.  This was set to timeout after 10 minutes, so I increased the timeout to 2 hours, so that this wouldn’t cause any delays either.

I wasn’t unduly concerned at this point about problems with inbound mail and spammers clogging up the system as I had already installed a SAN/UCC SSL certificate (minimum 5 Domain Names) bought from www.exchange-certificates.com and had re-pointed port 25 to the SBS 2011 server.

So having made as many changes to the network and SMTP Virtual Server Settings (also restarting the Simple Mail Transport Service) I created a new Receive Connector on the SBS 2011 server to only receive mail from the IP Address of the SBS 2003 server and set the Maximum Message Size Limit to 50Mb and let the two servers talk to each other.

Sometime overnight on the Saturday after starting the migration, the whole 50Gb of Public Folders had migrated across to the SBS 2011 server and all the Public Folder Instances had disappeared!  A whole 5½ days later.

At one point during the PF Replication, I calculated that it was moving at about 500Mb per hour, so all in all, it was going to take in the region of 100 hours to move the entire database.

So – if you are planning a migration from SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 and you have a large Public Folder Database, don’t expect the migration to complete quickly.  Assuming the worst – a Public Folder Database with 75Gb of data in it, I would expect it to take about a week and a half just to push the data to the new server.

Happy migrating!

SBS 2003 Connect To The Internet Wizard Fails At Firewall Configuration

Today I was working on a problem where an SBS 2003 server was having issues re-running the Connect To The Internet Wizard whereby the Wizard started happily to re-configure the server but then failed at the Firewall configuration.  The server also had ISA Server 2004 installed.

The reason for re-running the wizard was because emails were not flowing properly out of the server and re-running the Internet Connection Wizard was a good place to start troubleshooting.  Because the Wizard was failing, it was a strong possibility that the Firewall / ISA server was causing the issue.

Having examined the ICWLOG.TXT file to see what might be causing the issue (from C:\Program Files\Microsoft Windows Small Business Server\Support) it showed the following errors:

Error 0x80070003 returned from call to Configuring IIS to listen only on the LAN().
Error 0x80070003 returned from call to CStingrayCommit::DoGeneralConfiguration().
Error 0x80070003 returned from call to Doing general configuration().
Error 0x80070003 returned from call to CStingrayCommit::CommitEx().

Doing some digging on the webs for an answer, I checked a few sites but drew a blank, then I found the following site (http://www.windows-server-answers.com/microsoft/Windows-Server-SBS/32257468/icw-fail-on-firewall-step.aspx) and it pointed me to check the registry for the following key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SmallBusinessServer\Intranet
the ‘companywebpath’ key showed this value:

IIS://LOCALHOST/W3SVC/4

Opening up IIS Manager, I then checked the IIS Website Identifier Value for the CompanyWeb site (see example image below) :
and saw that it was showing a different value, in this case it was showing ‘448260875’.

Going back to the Registry key, I then changed the ‘companywebpath’ value to 448260875 to mirror the IIS Website Identifier and then closed Regedit.

Upon re-running the Connect To The Internet Wizard again, it completed happily and normal outbound mail-flow resumed.

I am sure that this isn’t the only reason for the wizard failing at the firewall stage, but it is one thing to rule out that isn’t exactly obvious.

SBS 2011 – Error moving Microsoft Sharepoint Foundation data location

If you are in the middle of migrating from SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 and are trying to move the Microsoft Sharepoint Foundation data location on the SBS 2011 server and receive the following error:

“An error occurred while attempting to move the Microsoft Sharepoint Foundation database”

Please check to see that the ports in use on the SBS 2003 server are 80 and 444.  I was just trying to move the location and it kept failing.

After a few searches with no useful information being found, I checked a couple of other SBS 2003 servers that I have access to and saw that the one I was trying to migrate was using port 81 and 444, so I changed the port to 80, stopped and started the website and then tried the move again and this time it completed.

SBS 2003 Physical to SBS 2011 Virtual Migration completed

I have just completed a migration from SBS 2003 as a physical server to SBS 2011 as a Virtual Server running on Microsoft Hyper-V and the entire process went without a hitch.

As usual, the article that I followed was Demazter’s excellent migration article.

I did have some fun working out how to create and load up the SBS migration file needed on the SBS 2011 server to tell the installation that it is a migration, not a clean install. After some head scratching, I created a Virtual Floppy Disk file, loaded it onto an existing Virtual Server, copied the SBS Answer File to the Virtual Floppy Disk, dismounted it, re-configured the SBS 2011 Virtual Server to also load the Virtual Floppy Disk and that was ll that was needed.

Again, the entire process took 3 days – which so far every other migration I have performed has taken. The longest / slowest part is the migration of Exchange Mailboxes and data, but once that is done, the rest is much quicker.

So, if you are wondering if you can migrate to SBS 2011 in a Virtual Server environment, I can happily confirm that it can.

SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 Migration #3 Under Way and Going Well

I’m now mid-way through my 3rd SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 migration and having used the following article for ALL the migrations, have had nothing but success so far.

http://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/02/24/migrate-small-business-server-2003-to-small-business-server-2011/

The current migration and my last migration are both being done on HP ML110 G6 servers, which initially caused a few headaches trying to install SBS 2011 from the DVD onto the internal HDD’s because once I had installed the relevant RAID controller drivers, the installation refused to continue, but this was solved and I wrote about this here:

https://alanhardisty.wordpress.com/2011/05/25/installing-sbs-2011-on-an-hp-proliant-ml110-g6-server-woes-resolved/

The process is very simple, but by far the slowest part of the migration I have come across so far is making sure the SBS 2003 server is patched within an inch of it’s life.

I spent almost 8 hours yesterday installing SBS 2003 SP1, Exchange 2003 SP2 and numerous other patches onto the soon-to-be-retired SBS 2003 server, which didn’t seem to have a processor in the box it was going that slowly.

Today the SBS 2011 install was much quicker and the majority of the migration has been completed, with just the data, shares and user accounts to be moved, then it’s remove Exchange 2003 from the SBS 2003 server and then DCPROMO the box, reboot it and then put it out of it’s misery 🙂

Once that is out of the way – it’s SSL certificate time from http://www.exchange-certificates.com and then the job is complete in the 3 days that I have estimated it will take.

If you are planning your own SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 migration, then Demazter’s guide comes tried and tested by me and I would highly recommend it.

If you are not brave enough to tackle it yourself – then please get in touch and I can help you complete it remotely.

Alan